"Still, it comes as a big surprise that while we have been declaring race dead, structural racism has clearly increased.  In fact 50 years after Civil Rights, 150 years after the Emancipation Proclamation, and during the first black presidency, white Americans currently hold at least 19 times the wealth of African-Americans (Kochhar 2010: 3). " Read more about the historic implications of capitalism, wealth building, and the burdens of debt for African Americans.

In 1964, about 19 percent of the U.S. population lived in poverty. Today, the national poverty rate hovers around 15 percent, 50 years after President Lyndon B. Johnson declared his "war on poverty." Healthcare and food programs such as SNAP, housing subsidies, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, "Despite their effectiveness at reducing poverty...

(VIA Truth-Out)Republicans are outraged for all the wrong reasons.This past Friday, $5 billion was automatically slashed from the federal food stamps program, affecting the lives of 47 million Americans.The USDA estimates that because of these cuts, a family of four who receives food stamps benefits will lose about 20 meals per month.But these enormous cuts to food stamps aren't enough for Republicans.They still want to slash an additional $40 billion from the program in the name of reducing spending and federal debt.

In September, just two days after a Census Bureau report showed that food stamps helped keep 4 million Americans out of poverty last year, the US House of Representatives approved a $39 billion cut to the program (known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP) over

The current Farm bill represents a new low in US politics. What used to be a fairly shared value - feeding the hungry - is now out the window. Previous arguments for cutting food programs focused on fraud and waste. Now, proponents of cuts do not deny that there is need or hunger. They are asserting, successfully, that there are people who don't deserve food even if they are hungry.

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President Johnson’s historic State of the Union address 50 years ago declared war on poverty and unemployment thanks largely to a large and vibrant grassroots movement. The focus then was on civil rights and ensuring that every “citizen” had the opportunity to make a living and live their life in civil liberty. Today, even these civil rights are under attack and basic human rights such as food are not guaranteed. In fact, as we reflect on this 50th year anniversary of the “War on Poverty,” it is clear that public policy has devolved into a “War on the Poor.”

This week marked the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s "War on Poverty."  Today, it seems as if the war is no longer on poverty—public policy has devolved into a war on the poor.  With catastrophic cuts being proposed to SNAP and other food support, it is important to reflect on an era when the eradication of hunger was on the political agenda and poverty was treated with more compassion and less condemnation. Below are some powerful quotes from a diverse set of leaders that remind us that food justice is a critical part of social justice. 

Responding to the smart and tireless work of education justice advocates across the country, and a year after the first Congressional hearing on the School to Prison Pipeline, the Departments of Education and Justice jointly issued a set of Federal Guidelines to change school discipline policies to address the widespread pattern in the United States of pushing students

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